Integrity Matters

An ICAI Blog providing the latest insights about academic integrity

 


 

With limited access to students over the summer period, and social distancing guidelines disrupting student gatherings this fall, universities need another way to develop student buy-in to their institutional honor codes. This can be done electronically. 

At the University of Georgia, students are provided with a link to “Take the Pledge” on the Academic Honesty website. This was embedded in online orientations for both undergraduate and graduate students and will be integrated into the academic integrity module set to pilot this fall. When students visit the link, they see the ...

As colleges and universities reopen, whether in-person or online, syllabi are rapidly changing to accommodate COVID-19 requirements. Each institution requires its syllabi to have certain elements. Some examples include: learning objectives, course schedule, grade breakdown, and access to university resources. One thing all syllabi should include is a statement on academic honesty expectations. While there should be a university wide statement regarding academic honesty, course-specific guidelines are equally important. Here are some things instructors may want to consider:

Collusion or collaboration. With the development of hy-flex, hybrid, and online courses, students need to know what they can access to study or where they can turn to for outside help. Can they dis...

Keeping academic integrity topics in your newsfeed may be difficult. If you have 10 minutes, here are a few articles you may find interesting:

Contract cheating is in the spotlight after a well attended webinar training by Dr. Robin Crockett of the University of Northampton.The webinar was recorded, and Dr. Crockett’s tips for educators have received an international audience.

Turnitin Originality was featured by Campus Technology as a tool to combat contract che...

In the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic and the resulting transition to online classes, exam integrity and course design has become a hotly debated topic. Many platforms offer training, webinars, and articles to assist faculty, but what has not become easier is dealing with third party study services such as Chegg, CourseHero, Socratic. Online testing may be driving academic dishonesty to unprecedented levels. Complicating this issue includes how difficult it is for faculty members to remove exam or course content and have those vendors initiate honor investigations. 

For example, in order to remove a question from Chegg and initiate an honor investigation, faculty must have their institutional o...

As academic integrity practitioners, we often talk about academic integrity and assessment design. We make checklists of things faculty should and should not do to foster honest student work. We talk at them, and insist that faculty take on the additional burden of following whatever academic integrity policy is in place at your institution. But when was the last time we listened to their needs and concerns?

One of the best ideas from the last ICAI Annual Conference was a Faculty Listening Tour. This is an opportunity to engage your faculty, and build trust with them as stakeholders. While you should always include faculty in the creation of an institution’s policy, the relationship should not end when the policy is enacted. Instead, it is our responsibility to continue to dev...

Academic integrity continues to be a problem across all disciplines that require intensive writing and extensive student projects. From my experience tutoring two students in the STEM field, I have witnessed their struggle with academic integrity and observed their development with keen interest. Specifically, both students find it challenging to understand the policies and expectations around academic integrity, specifically around plagiarism. This resulted in their failure to complete their courses successfully.  To reduce their chances of academic dishonesty, they reached out...

Mahal Miles, (pictured, photo credit Hamza Molvi ) is a 3rd year economics major at Oregon State University. Mahal offers her perspectives on academic integrity as a follow up to Isaac Parham’s recent post, and provides several research articles as additional resources for our readers. 

Another Student’s Perspective: A response to Issac Parham’s spotlight post

Isaac contributed some thought-provoking points to the academic integrity discourse. I am moved to build upon Isaac’s analysis. I will identify who students are and how students make decisions about cheating. Finally, I will explore what faculty, institutions, and students can do.

...

Academic Integrity Training for Students and Faculty
GVSU’s Office of Student Conduct and Conflict Resolution
Anthony T. Williams, Jr.

Holding students accountable for academic misconduct has been a priority for colleges and universities since the beginning of higher education. Faculty expect and trust that their students will honestly complete work independently as they pursue their academic studies. Like many universities, Grand Valley State University (GVSU) understands that we must use a multifaceted approach to address academic misconduct effectively.  In addition to the facilitation of a  restorative, socially just, and educational conduct process, GVSU’s Office of Student Conduct and Conflict Resolution (OSCCR) provides students an...

It is time to be strategic.

As we prepare for next semester, it seems as if there is more to do and less time than ever before.  Managing increasing academic misconduct caseloads with limited budgets and few staff can seem especially daunting. Faculty managing academic misconduct may feel removed from the process, relying on online tutorials and remote communication to resolve issues. Students are overwhelmed and making sense of an altered learning environment.

There is an ongoing, meaningful conversation about the increases in sophistication of computer-assisted tools designed to pass off unattributed academic work, or to provide test and assignment answers. An immediate response is to be as vigilant as possible, to prevent the perception of academic dishonesty. In...

Spotlight: The Alberta Council on Academic Integrity

 Statement Against Racism in Matters Related to Academic Integrity

On June 4th, 2020, the Alberta Council on Academic Integrity released a Statement Against Racism in Matters Relating to Academic Integrity. The group formed in 2019 to promote and advocate for academic integrity across Alberta.

The Alberta Council on Academic Integrity stands united against systemic racism and discrimination in all forms. As such, they have released a statement recognizing and opposing the racism evident in the manner in which particular students are identified, reported and sanctioned for breaches of academic integrity based on race, colour or language.

The council issue...