Integrity Matters

An ICAI Blog providing the latest insights about academic integrity

 


 

Si preguntas a ChatGPT qué parámetros éticos utiliza con relación a la integridad académica, la respuesta será muy cercana a la siguiente:

“ChatGPT no incorpora parámetros éticos relacionados con la integridad académica. Es una herramienta que genera texto basado en patrones aprendidos de diversas fuentes de datos, y no tiene una comprensión inherente de las consideraciones éticas. La responsabilidad de utilizar ChatGPT de forma ética y garantizar la integridad académica recae en los usuarios, como educadores, estudiantes o desarrolladores que integren el modelo en aplicaciones".

La respuesta deja en la responsabilidad de los individuos y las instituciones a las que pertenecen su uso responsable y ético. La herramienta no impone restricciones éticas, per...

If you are anything like me, completing an ICAI program proposal submission form has been on your to-do list for the last month. There just hasn’t been time to make it happen. Perhaps it is life, work, or your own tendency towards perfectionism that has led to your procrastination. Personally, one of the only ways I have found it possible to overcome some of these obstacles is to think about the positives that would come from getting that task done. So, as that November 20, 2023, conference program proposal deadline quickly approaches, let’s explore all those good things that would come from presenting at this conference.

Contributions to the Field: ICAI membership is comprised of instructors, researchers, staff members, and organizational l...

Recently, with the revolution caused by recent advances in Artificial Intelligence (AI), I have observed how the use and abuse of AI-based tools has become popular among my students. A misuse, sometimes conscious but other times unconscious because it is a tool and the student himself is the one who handles it. Talking to different students, I perceive that they put the morality of the act in whether they manipulate the tool or not, and not so much in the intellectual property of what is delivered.

Obviously AI is a tool and as such it has no morality, as long as it does not have conscience, freedom and voluntariness for its actions. Therefore, the morality of the acts we perform using AI will depend on the use we make of the tool. That is, not everything we, students or teacher...

Una búsqueda rápida en Google sobre inteligencia artificial (IA) arroja un preocupante porcentaje de resultados que se enfocan en “herramientas” para hacer las tareas dentro de los 5 primeros links a consultar. Esos que son prioritarios y que suelten tener más del 75% de las consultas. Sin mencionar el contenido vital de TikTok, Youtube, Instagram y cualquier otra red social disponible ofreciendo tips sobre cómo usar la AI sin que quienes van a evaluar las tareas se den cuenta. Muchas veces las tareas se consideran una carga inútil, un proceso tedioso que no tienen necesariamente uso práctico, una interrupción para otras actividades, sin mencionar problemas como estrés, exceso de actividades diarias y, por supuesto, la ausencia de...

It was a great joy to co-host the International Day of Action for Academic Integrity #IDoA2023 on October 18 with Rachel Gorjup, University of Toronto Mississauga. This is the first year with the new positive and educational title of the event (from the previous title of ‘International Day of Action Against Contract Cheating’) which enabled us to broaden the scope and interest in the event. Our carefully framed theme for this year of ‘Championing academic integrity in the age of AI’ also kept our focus firmly on promoting academic integrity all day, while acknowledging the current challenges with Artificial Intelligence.

Panel perspectives

One of the key ways we aimed to champion academic integrity this year was through our five student panels ac...

“And now, Margaret is here to talk about everyone’s favor topic, academic integrity.” This was the introduction I received at a recent meeting of senior administrators at my university.

There was nothing unusual in these words. Academic integrity is widely viewed by faculty, administrators, students and parents as a distasteful problem, something we would wish away if we could. I admit there are moments I wish this myself.

But after more than a decade overseeing academic integrity policy and case management in collaboration with wonderful colleagues, I have arrived at a more radical and more practical conclusion: The breakneck expansion of generative artificial intelligence offers a rare opportunity – and an ethical imperative - to radically transform the approac...

The final pillar for Giving Voice to Values (Gentile, 2012) is reasons and rationalizations. In academic integrity work, student rationalizations for academic misconduct are dominant in the decision-making process when students cheat (Stephens, 2017).  In general, people want to be “good” and will always rationalize their behavior by disengaging morally to avoid cognitive dissonance. If educators expect students to stand up for academic integrity, for example through a requirement that they report their peers for academic misconduct in an honor code, then they should train those students to identify and recognize when those rationalizations occur. Gentile (2012) argues that recognizing and naming the unethical argument reduces its power. At this point it is no longer an assumpt...

This week, I am exploring the next two pillars of Gentile’s (2012) Giving Voice to Values: self-knowledge and voice. When people possess a more intimate knowledge of themselves, they can better uphold their desired self-image. This can help people focus on aligning their values with how they view themselves, making them more likely to speak and act on those values. Self-knowledge also provides an insight into people’s “voice” or their approach to standing up for personal values. It can put people in touch with the appropriate framework.

Borrowing from Dees & Crampton (1991)’s framework, we can understand idealists as those who act on their values no matter the cost, opportunists as those who focus on material well-being over values, and pragmatists as thos...

Last week, I wrote about helping students find academic integrity in their values. Today, I’m transitioning to Gentile’s (2012) three pillars of choice, normalization, and purpose. Voicing academic integrity as a value can only happen when students view being academically honest as a choice. We can normalize this by building cultures that promote honest academic work. Faculty and staff can help students see the value of being students. When the purpose of education is to learn, students may find that making choices that align with their values is a regular occurrence. This in turn gives them the courage to speak out when someone violates that norm.

Gentile (2012, p. 47) writes, “Free will is a matter of free will.” In other words, when students believe they have a choice...

Fall semester is underway for many of us as we welcome new students and already enrolled students to our learning settings. New semesters bring plenty of reasons to be excited and positive in our roles as educators, leaders, and researchers in academia. We would be remiss, however, to downplay the effects that we continue to experience post-pandemic across our learning environments and within our approaches to teaching-learning. Just as we began to share a collective deep breath and settled into new ways of engaging our students we were met with a second challenge, the unprecedented global rise of artificial intelligence applications. Free access to some of the different applications has allowed students to easily adopt them into their daily academic work, sometimes with little apprecia...