Integrity Matters

An ICAI Blog providing the latest insights about academic integrity

 


 

Four people talking and working together.

It seems safe to say that successful academic endeavors involving working in groups are valuable experiences for students.  The experiences gained from working in groups, and the skills acquired, are generally accepted as being transferable to future employment and are highly valued by employers (see recent blog post: Group Work is not just for Students).  An idyllic group project would have our students effectively planning, communicating, collaborating, and creating to successfully reach a common goal.

More often than not, it seems, group projects are detested by students for a variety of reasons, some of which are perfectly reasonable.  The most often I hear in my own practice is that one (or more) group members contributed virtually nothing during the process....

Photo of a smartphone on a desk next to a person

Academic integrity is a difficult topic of conversation. While every campus is different, most of employ plenty of individuals who are asked to have one-on-one conversations with students about academic integrity. Instructors may need to ask a student about a suspicious incident. Staff members may need to interview a student about a potential violation. Conduct board representatives may have to discuss incidents with students. These conversations might be in person, by email, in a classroom, during a hearing, etc. Most institutions are very intentional in how they go about ensuring academic integrity – how can we be equally intentional when we converse with individuals involved with or affected by potential acts of academic dishonesty?

I arrived at this topic after considering...

Picture of Dr. Paul Cronan

Dr. Timothy Paul Cronan was the 2022 recipient of the ICAI Lifetime Achievement Award. He is an internationally known teacher and researcher who also performs a wide variety of service obligations as a professor in the Information Systems Department. He has served as a faculty member since 1979 and has authored many papers and led conference sessions based on academic integrity. He was an early pioneer in recognizing the impacts of academic integrity. He has also published in numerous high-quality journals in the Information Systems field, was a co-founder of the Teaching Center, and has won numerous prestigious awards related to teaching and mentoring during his career. He has developed academic programs and served in a department leadership capacity.

Although he clearly has ma...

Full audience with hands raised.

The pandemic served as a catalyst for change around the world and across many different sectors. The educational sector was dramatically affected and required us to rethink our long-standing pedagogies and organizational structures. Just as it seemed we were settling into our new normal, artificial intelligence exploded onto the scene and served to play perhaps even a larger role as a disruptor to our set practices across the educational landscape. The initial panic associated with artificial intelligence is slowly being replaced by an appreciation and understanding of the incredible opportunities we have as educators, researchers, and leaders, to positively impact the educational experience of our students.

Both the pandemic and artificial intelligence have created circumstance...

Student group work is intended to support and enhance creativity, productivity, and collaboration between students. The skills associated with successful group work are considered transferable to the workplace and are highly valued by employers across industries (Grizmek et al., 2020). Given the nuances of our new work worlds and the realities that our graduates will be likely to face complex problems that require them to navigate and negotiate solutions in teams, group work remains a worthwhile endeavour.  But the merits of group work are not limited to student work.

Artificial intelligence has exploded across the world, creating tremendous opportunities, and many questions about its ethical use and deployment in different settings. In the educational sector, it has served...

Spring cleaning is synonymous with leaving winter months behind. In the northern hemisphere, the time for spring cleaning is quickly approaching. As we declutter from the hibernation-like state experienced during the short days and limited opportunities to be outside, we clear our hearts and minds. The Cleveland Clinic gives us seven reasons spring cleaning benefits our health: feelings of accomplishment, destressing, finding peace, improving focus, reducing hazards, increasing movement, and decreasing depressive symptoms. These are wonderful reasons to clean out our living spaces, but we do not always apply these same concepts in our workspaces.

How can we s...

The ICAI annual conference is just around the corner! As I have been planning which sessions to attend and looking forward to connecting with peers from across the globe, I cannot help but to reflect on how previous conferences have impacted my own practice by helping develop programs, initiatives, and providing support. Here are three ways the ICAI conferences have influenced my office:

Online Academic Integrity Modules
In 2019, at the New Orleans conference, Jennifer Wright from the University of Central Florida presented on their new online module. This interactive module helped students understand step-by-step positions that the student and the instructor found themselves in. It also explained the expectations of the university. The module appe...

Artificial intelligence1 has existed in the academic integrity space for several years, but the release of OpenAI’s ChatGPT has caused the term to become synonymous with student academic misconduct. In fact, it has been banned from New York City and Seattle public schools. Teachers and higher education instructors seemingly face limited options for assessments, they can ei...

This week, I am reviewing a recent article from Educational Research Review. The full citation can be found here:

Co, M. J., Kerbage, S. H., Willetts, G., Garvey, L., Bhattacharya, A., Croy, G., and Mitchel, B. (2023). Students coping with change in higher education: An overview. Educational Research Review, 38(1), 1-25. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.edurev.2023.100508

Using a systematic literature review process, the authors look at student coping and coping strategies within higher education. In reviewing this article, I see several parallels to academic integrity, though I admit that I am extrapolating...

La Integridad Académica es uno de los pilares formativos de la UC, por lo que busca que la comunidad universitaria avance en la construcción de una cultura basada en los valores de honestidad, veracidad, confianza, justicia, respeto y responsabilidad.

Como ya se ha comentado en este mismo blog, uno de los esfuerzos fue potenciar la Integridad Académica, implementando un protocolo para gestionar los casos identificados como potenciales faltas.  Incorporándose la elaboración de una carta que permita al estudiante realizar un ejercicio reflexivo y una entrevista personal del estudiante con el Comité.

En este artículo nos centraremos en compartir prácticas para el desarrollo de entrevistas con estudiantes en el contexto de faltas a la Integridad Académica, en l...